October 19, 2016

Sexual Health Education for Young People with Disabilities

Filed under: Data,Featured,News,Providers,Publications,Resources — Tags: , — Ryan Olsen @ 1:44 pm

Research and Resources for Parents/Guardians:

In recent years, important changes in public policies and attitudes have resulted in improved opportunities for people with physical and intellectual disabilities. Unfortunately, societal attitudes have changed less in regard to sexuality and disability. Even today, many people do not acknowledge that most people experience sexual feelings, needs, and desires, regardless of their abilities. As a result, many young people, including those with disabilities, receive little or no formal sexual health education, either in school or at home. All young people need access to and can benefit from sexual health information. Young people with disabilities have the same right to this education as their peers, however considerations must be made in order to modify the program to allow for information to be understood and learned in a way that is meaningful to them.

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August 23, 2016

The 2016 Kids Count Data is Here!

Filed under: Data,Decision Makers,News,Providers,Publications — Tags: — Ryan Olsen @ 7:47 pm

The KIDS COUNT Data Book is an annual publication that assesses child well-being nationally and across the 50 states, as well as in the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. Using an index of 16 indicators, the report ranks states on overall child well-being and in economic well-being, education, health and family and community.

The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2016 KIDS COUNT Data Book finds today’s youth — Generation Z — are healthier and completing high school on time despite mounting economic inequality and increasingly unaffordable college tuition. Aided by smart policies and investments in prevention, a record number of teens are making positive choices. This year, the annual report focuses on key trends in child well-being in the post-recession years and offers recommendations for how policymakers can ensure all children are prepared for the future, based on the country’s shared values of opportunity, responsibility and security.

Please click here for the complete Kids Count Data Book

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